Monday, 22 October 2012

Produce a Bayeux Tapestry replica? No problem (thanks to the Scrapstore)!

When Daughter left primary school in July, there was a part of me that was inwardly jumping up and down excitedly and punching the air. No more Easter bonnets or costumes to make at short notice! (I am still psychologically scarred from Easter 2010 when we had to turn around an Aztec costume, a 'famous historical person' costume and two lots of 'spring mufti', alongside egg decorating and making an 'egg-vention', in the space of four days. The children just wouldn't accept my argument that an Easter bunny outfit could legitimately count as a 'famous historical person' and 'spring mufti').

There may well be no Easter bonnets or historical dressing up days at secondary school, but I hadn't bargained on homeworks like 'Produce a scene from the Bayeux tapestry by next week (extra marks for not just drawing it).' I shouldn't grumble really - this kind of 'doing' homework is right up Dyslexic Daughter's street. And all that bonnet and costume-making has taught us a few things; most notably that it's best to stick with a simple idea. Tapestry and sewing are all very well, but not when you've only got seven days! My other rule is that these kind of projects should not involve spending a lot of money.

Daughter came up with a collage idea, but realised that apart from some backing fabric and a shiny scarf that could be used for chainmail, we were lacking both resources, and the time to go out and search for them. How could she get the project done and keep to the minimal spend rule?

Wiltshire Scrapstore to the rescue!


Lacock Abbey

You may know Lacock in Wiltshire as a picture postcard village, home to an historical Abbey managed by the National Trust that provided the setting for Professor Snape's potion class in the film Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. We, however, also love Lacock for being home to a children's and community charity, the Wiltshire Scrapstore: "The Scrapstore is an Aladdin's cave of unusual materials. There are various Scrapstores based around the country, each servicing a particular community area.  We cover Wiltshire (excluding Swindon) and the surrounding area.  We have one of the largest, busiest Scrapstores in the country, full of 'scrap' material donated by industry, that would otherwise have gone to landfill, to meet the needs of our 3000+ members." 


The Scapstore's retail outlet - craft kits, art and craft materials, recycled gifts etc

We've attended their holiday workshops, bought recycled gifts in their shop, and in a Bayeux Tapestry emergency situation, we've discovered they have an online shop! Phewee! Felt, fabric crayons, slivers of silvery card and PVA glue were all ordered on the Sunday, and hand delivered the next day. (We might have spent a little bit more than intended, but at least we're well equipped and won't get caught out when the next crafty homework comes along!) You too can avail yourself of their online operation for all sorts of art and craft materials, very reasonably priced, although if you're not like us and don't live within a few miles of Lacock, you'll probably have to rely on Royal Mail for your delivery. Or why not check out what your local Scrapstore offers?

Oh and if you're wondering, here's Daughter's version of Harold with the arrow! Scrapstore, we couldn't have done it without you! I completely agree with customer Sam (age unspecified) who features on the website testimonial page, "I think this shop is apserlootly amazing!"








7 comments:

  1. Bloody brilliant! I want to go to this scrap store! That homework is FANTASTIC!! Well done! Now then, word of warning for the future, my daughter did textiles at A Level. I had NO idea that I'd be up in the wee small hours sourcing black cashmere from Germany to make a red riding coat! Seriously over the two years I bet we spent over £300 on stuff. And that was always carefully picked for bargain ness !!
    I hope the homework was fully appreciated and that she wins a prize :/) . Great read xx

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    1. Thanks for the heads up Rachel - I'd better start saving now, if this is only the beginning!!

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  2. Several comments come to mind. Is the homework for the kids or for the parents? It seems as if many of the homework assignments can't be done without a lot of parental involvement. That used to drive me crazy.

    I didn't realize that the first Harry Potter book was marketed under two different names between the US and UK. Harry Potter and the Soccer's Stone vs. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.

    I haven't seen anything equivalent to scrap stores over here. They sound wonderful.

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    1. So far, the parental involvement in homework hasn't been too bad but there are some big 'home learning projects' looming that I'm sure will require a lot of support. I didn't know that about the Harry Potter books either, but then I'm not a big HP fan.

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  3. Very interesting. I'm trying to think of a US equivalent to Scrapstore. I really can't think of anything close. You daughter's tapestry scene came out nicely. I hope she feels good about it.
    My own two daughters had a ridiculous assignment the very first week of school this year. It kept them both up to 2 AM and they still didn't finish it. The kicker was, it was for their physics class and it had absolutely nothing to do with physics.

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    1. Scrapstores are great. They've been around a while - I first came across the Hackney Scrapstore nearly 20 years ago when I worked in London. That does sound a ridiculous Physics assignment! 2am!*?

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