Wednesday, 23 October 2013

We're cooking on gas...

Welcome to our new arrival. 

No, not more photos of the kittens. It's better than that, nearly.


A plain old gas cooker. She's been a long time coming - two months to be precise. Our old oven packed up just after I'd spent an August afternoon cleaning it. Doh!

In that ovenless two months , we've had lots of boring, middle-aged, sensible, grown-up discussions about cookers so it seems only fair to share the fruits of our extensive research. Prepare to be amazed by all the...


stuff we have learned about cookers!


  • Cooking on gas is cheaper. "If you use your cooker’s oven, grill and hob for about one hour and 20 minutes a day for a year, an electric cooker will cost about £53 to run. A gas cooker will only cost £16, giving you an annual saving of £37, or £222 over the lifetime of your cooker." Source: Which.co.uk


  • Unless you're running your cooker on renewable electricity, gas is the low CO2 option. Source: ethicalconsumer.org 


  • Repairing a cooker is a good option, but with labour and parts the cost for fixing ours would have been £162, which, considering the oven was secondhand in the first place, was simply not worthwhile.


  • Having a cooker where the hob and the grill work, even if the oven doesn't is still something of a luxury. Every time I felt like grumbling I thought of this...




The risks from dying as a result of cooking on a solid fuel fire indoors are still high for many people across the world, so even with our broken oven, we are amongst the fortunate. Poor us that we couldn't bake potatoes, cook pizza or make cakes? I don't think so.

  • The oven is the expensive and most energy consuming part of a cooker, so now that we've got a working oven again, we'll continue with all the wily ways of avoiding using the oven that we've discovered over the last couple of months such as using the griddle pan instead of roasting, cooking things on the hob and then popping under the grill for a quick crisping (e.g. cauliflower cheese) rather than baking. We also tried using the bread maker for cake baking but this resulted in cakes with burnt edges. 


  • It's easy to dispose of an old cooker. We found a local waste clearance company who will come and pick up scrap metals for free. Although we could have taken it to a scrappie ourselves, this got it out of the way quickly.


  • Secondhand gas cookers are harder to find than electric ones. When we finally had some spare moments to devote to searching for a cooker, it took us a couple of weeks of rigorous scouring Gumtree and Ebay. Like buses, two finally came along at once, and we won our Ebay cooker from a house clearance place just round the corner, for the princely sum of £63. She's not fancy, just a real no-frills cooker, but we're no-frills people so that's fine. She grills, bakes and boils, and that's good enough for us.

How about you - gas or electric? Are you cutting down on your oven-use too these days?



15 comments:

  1. Good news for you and thank you for that poster picture. Very thought provoking.

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    1. I've seen the infographic on various blogs and it's always stuck with me.

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  2. Good post (and nice poster). We use gas for the hob and electric for the oven and grill, but I will admit I do tend to also use my slow cooker for lots of stuff as well. ;o)

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    1. Ooh yes I forgot to mention the slow cooker. We use ours a lot too especially at this time of year.

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  3. I wish that I had a gas stove, but we don't have gas available in our area. Enjoy your new purchase. I like the line about that you are no frills people. I feel that is what we are too.
    And it is time for more kitty pictures.

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  4. Same here; no gas line available - but I would love to have a gas range as everyone knows the heat control on the stovetop is superior! And I have to admit I was hoping you'd sneak a kitten picture in.

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    1. I love gas for the reason you mention but if I could have a sustainably powered cooker then I'd be prepared to do without the more controllable flame.

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  5. This is a very timely piece as we're all facing up to another hike in energy bills. I hadn't realised that cooking with gas was cheaper than electricity or about the oven being the most expensive part. As you know we've had adventures with a broken oven. Although that's repaired and working now the microwave has just died on us. Think it's too big to take to the next Repair Cafe so it may be another trip to the Dorothy House Furniture & Electrical shop...

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    1. Our microwave died a few months ago too. So far we've managed without replacing it and I like the extra space in our small kitchen but it is an eco dilemma because they are low energy consumers...what to do!?

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  6. No oven here either! I use my slowcooker a lot and we purchased an induction burner because some things just turn out better that way (eg pasta)

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    1. So you are oven free by choice? That's interesting.

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  7. We don't have a gas line, but our gas hob is connected to BBQ gas cylinders. It takes us 14 weeks to go through a gas cylinder, or about $2.50/week. I have reduced our oven cooking a lot over the last year - done batch cooking, cooked in our convection microwave. I love gas cooking - it is so quick and responds immediately. Well done for finding a secondhand one!

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    1. Sounds as if you are very energy conscious with your cooking Jo.

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  8. Gas all the way. So much easier to cook on... but much harder to bake in. Ah well some you win some you loose.

    love to hear that someone else scours ebay and gumtree for just the right 2nd hand appliance.

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