Monday, 25 July 2016

Five things we love about Airbnb

I had never heard of Airbnb until just over a year ago when an acquaintance mentioned they had used the website to find somewhere to stay in France. Perhaps I'd been living under a rock* or something up to that point, because then it started popping up everywhere...Several of the frugal blogs mentioned Airbnb in passing, as if it was already a word in the Oxford English Dictionary that had been in common parlance for years. A friend came to stay and told me all about renting out her spare bedroom. And it's featured in the media a lot over the last year - the Airbnb'ers who throw wild parties in rented apartments and make life a misery for the neighbours, the insurance and tax implications for hosts, and Airbnb as part of the rise of the sharing economy.

Last summer we were after some accommodation in Devon for part of a week, after staying with family. If you've ever tried to find holiday accommodation in Devon in August for an unusual amount of time i.e. not a full week, it's tricky. Accommodation is at peak price and peak demand. You can probably see where I'm going with this...Yes, I found myself on the Airbnb website, and lo and behold, booked accommodation for four, for half a week, and it didn't cost an arm and a leg.

Since then we've used Airbnb for a bargain break in Lille, France, for a few days, and I nearly used it for an overnight stay in Bristol although I later cancelled the booking, which unintentionally gave me the chance to test out Airbnb's cancellation process.

I suppose you could say we're Airbnb converts. Especially as we've not had any negative experiences. What, therefore, are our favourite Airbnb things?

1) The relationship with the hosts - I guess they're out to get good ratings from their guests, but all our Airbnb hosts have been a pleasure to deal with via email and in real life. The host in Devon deserves a bonus for giving us the chance to feed her Alpacas, whilst the host in France gets extra points for tolerating my attempts to practise my rusty French on her. The Bristol host (whom I never met in person) was also admirable in returning my payment when I cancelled. (I didn't meet the criteria for a partial, let alone a full refund, so this was totally unexpected but much appreciated).


Friendly Airbnb Host and Alpacas
2) You get to see parts that other b'n'bs cannot reach...the slightly rough around the edges or residential parts that wouldn't normally attract a b'n'b. In France this meant that we stuck out like sore thumbs in the local boulangerie and supermarket, but this was a good thing because we got to chat with the locals who wanted to know where these weird English people had sprung up from and what we were doing there. 

3) You can get a good idea of the accommodation and the hosts from the website. For us, this has meant we are able to bypass places where it looks as if you would have to tread on egg shells or incur a hefty cleaning fee (not that we'd be throwing wild parties or anything) and are able to go for places that are more of a home from home i.e. practical and non-deluxe but comfortable. And therefore, relatively cheap. France was the cheapest of all - £37 per night for a whole, large, lovely appartment.

4) There is something appealing in the ethos of the sharing economy - using what's already there rather than consuming 'new' feels more sustainable. However the sharing economy isn't necessarily sustainable - as users we have to make it such. (And in fact there is an argument that the likes of Uber and Airbnb are anything but sustainable and are in fact part of a neoliberal, tax-evading, unregulated private sector...)

5) The website is super easy to use, even for a non-techy like me, and in all cases the hosts have responded really quickly.

So for now, based on our minimal experience, Airbnb gets a cautious thumbs up from us. How about you, have you got any Airbnb stories to share?

* If you, like under-a-rock dwelling me, have ever wondered what Airbnb is all about, here's an overview (taken from the BT website) : "Airbnb is an online marketplace which lets people rent out their properties or spare rooms to guests. Airbnb takes 3% commission of every booking from hosts, and between 6% and 12% from guests. There’s plenty of criteria to list for/search a property: from a shared room to an entire house, to having a swimming pool to having a washing machine. There are photos of the property, and the hosts/guests, with full map listing."

3 comments:

  1. While we have not officially done Airbnb, we did stay for a week in a house rented out by an individual. It was cheaper than a hotel and much more comfortable. While I love meeting new people, I'm still hesitant about staying with other people unless I know them.

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  2. I haven't used them but people I know who have are positive. I'm a bit
    unsure. In my poor backpacker days I had no hesitation about staying
    with people I didn't (or barely) knew. Not so these days - particularly
    after a bad experience a few years ago staying with a friend of a friend
    who we didn't know very well. Good friends, fine. Strangers, no. To be
    honest it hasn't really come up since we travel most frequently to Japan
    and that's such a full on country that at the end of the day, you want a
    bit of privacy.

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  3. We have a room on Airbnb, check out our listing - boutique garden chalet in Ceredigion.

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